Thursday, April 29, 2010

Garuda Vintage watch with Ronda Swiss Movement


GARUDA watch

watch specification,
Garuda - Jet Travel 990
Manual Winding - Ronda swiss movement. 23 jewels.
20micron gold plated.
leather strap not original.
dimension 35 * 35mm
super deluxe, waterproof,swiss shockproof.tropicalized and anti-magnetic.
symbol patent S24581-M31217 GARUDA GREEN BIRD
minor wear and tear due aging
Vintage specimen for collectible item who beloved with its narative story....or relevancy HIStory of Soekarno.
asking price : RM 280

Ronda Watch Brief History

1946
Foundation of RONDA Ltd. Lausen by Mr. William Mosset. Production of components for a wide variety of watch movements.


1952
Start of production of ebauches or "movement blanks" under license for BRAC.

1961
Production of the first RONDA ebauches after a long struggle with the Swiss authorities, who were protecting the so-called "watchmaking statute". Thus RONDA was the first company apart from the big existing watch groups to receive these production-rights.

1972
New markets sprang up in Asia, leading to the creation of a subsidiary in Hong Kong as well as increasing market-activities in the USA.

1974
In the early 1970s, the advent of quartz technology sent shockwaves through the watchmaking industry. The new quartz movements were far more accurate than the traditional mechanical watches. With its dynamic spirit, RONDA was quick to develop its first quartz movement.

1980
During the 1980s, quartz technology conquered the global watchmaking industry. The worldwide market rose from about 50 million to 400 million in 1990. The wristwatch had become a fashion article.
Owing to unrelenting pressure on prices, production was heavily automated and partially shifted towards Asia.

1985
Death of William Mosset.

1990
The successful worldwide market penetration prompted RONDA to increase its production capacity in Asia. A new subsidiary was established in Thailand in 1990 for the assembly of watch movements as well as manufacturing electronic components.

1996
RONDA celebrated its 50th anniversary with a workforce of about 1000 people on three continents. RONDA receives the ISO 9001 certification, as the first European movement manufacturer.

1999
Inauguration of the new factory in Thailand, with a surface of approximately 8000 sqm.

2003
RONDA launches the first quartz chronograph with BIG DATE.

2004
Expansion of the production site in Lausen/Switzerland.

2005
Launch of RONDA mastertech 6000 - Big Date movements 11½'''

2006
Launch of RONDA mastertech 7000 - Big Date Day Retrograde movements 15'''

2008
New production plant in Stabio/ Switzerland for the assembly of Swiss Made movements and Swiss Made watches on a contract basis.

2009
Third factory in Thailand.

2010
Launch of RONDA mastertech 8000 - Big Date Chronograph & Retrograde movements 15'''

Sunday, April 25, 2010

West End Watch Co. for sale - Sowar Prima


This watch is my personal collection, I have to give it up to make way for other new watches. This is definitely a Good Piece to own for collector. It is a Luxury West End Swiss watch. The Original stainless steel strap is in excellent condition. Buckle is signed with West End Logo "W". You will definitely feel proud to own it. This is a Rare West End Sowar "PRIMA" watch
100 % percent authentic Internal Movement. An excellent authentic watch to add to your collection.

• Model: COLLECTABLE VINTAGE SWISS WEST END AUTOMATIC WINDING - SOWAR PRIMA RARE WATCH
• Movement : 100% Authenic West End Mechnical Movements. Made in SWISS
• Face Dial: Beautiful Face Dial with minor wear and tear scratches
• Case : Stainless Steel Back Case
• Size : 34*34
• Condition : This watch is in Good Running condition

Price:RM180



BRIEF HISTORY OF WEST END WRISTWATCHES


West End Watch Company is a manufacturer of watches located at Leytron (Switzerland). It is one of the oldest Swiss brands and has been in business for more than 120 years.
The West End Watch Company history comes from the company Alcide Droz & Sons established in St-Imier, Switzerland in 1864 which developed the first attested waterproof watch called “L’Imperméable” which is now found at the International Watch Museum of La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland. Established in 1886, the first West End Watches were produced by Alcide Droz & Sons and distributed on the Indian market for resale.

During World War I, West End Watch Co. produces its first wristwatches for the soldiers of the British Army and the brand becomes legendary in the Middle-East. With 15 million watches sold throughout the world during the more than 120 years of uninterrupted activity since its creation, West End is today one of the most highly esteemed Swiss watch brand names in the world. This worldwide reputation has essentially been built on the high level of customer satisfaction with the brand, especially in India, the Middle East and China. Now Hamilton and Brewer carries these fine West End Swiss watches.
The company has produced and distributed more than 15 million watches worldwide since 1886.
History
The West End Watch Company was created in 1886. The West End, a district of the centre of London, inspired its name to Mr. Arnold Charpié who was the Bombay representative of the Alcide Droz & Sons firm, a watch company established at Saint-Imier (Canton of Bern) in Switzerland.
In 1886, MM. Amstutz and Droz, the owner of Alcide Droz & Sons firm, began the exploitation of the trademark West End Watch Company in the Indian Market and developed the first waterproof pocket watch ever produced [1] : "L'Impermeable" (nowadays exposed at the International Watchmaking Museum of La Chaux-de-Fonds).
During the First World War, a large task of British and Indian soldiers was sent from Bombay to the Persian Gulf to reach the Mesopotamia (the current Iraq). They received some West End Watches.
In 1917, West End Watch Company changed its name to Société des Montres West End SA and is registered in Geneva. At the same time the sub-brand Sowar was also registered.
In 1934, the Société des Montres West End SA was the first brand to introduce the Incabloc anti-shock system invented by Mr. Braunschweig.[2]
In 1973, after several years of development, the company was finally sold, for lack of heirs, to his main supplier : "Aubry Brothers Ltd", established in Noirmont (Jura) to keep open the Bombay West End Watch's office.
Since 2000 the workshops and the head centre of the company have been moved to Leytron, in Wallis. At the same time, the company was taken over by new shareholders and the management changed.
In 2005 West End Watch Company celebrated its 120th anniversary of uninterrupted presence in Asia with the introduction of its "Silk Road concept". This concept came from the fact the Silk Road crossed most of the regions where the brand possessed, and still possesses, counters.
Nowadays, West End Watch Company is active in Saudi Arabia, in the United Arab Emirates, in the Himalaya Range (in particular in Nepal and in Bhutan) and as well as in western half of China.
2010 A first in the Brands history, West End Watches are now exclusively distributed/sold in the USA and Canada by Empire Brands. EB is a distributor of leading products around the globe.
In 2011, West End Watch Company will celebrate its 125 years of uninterrupted activity so a commemorative book redrawing the history of the brand will be published in 2010 in association with the Centre Jurassien d’Archives et de Recherches Economiques.[3]
The model still manufactured today is Sowar. In Hindu, Sowar means "warrior" and this name was selected in honor of Sir Thomas Edward Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia) because it's said that him and his soldiers wore some West End Watch Company watches during the war.

Saturday, April 24, 2010

Silvana vintage Swiss Wristwatch for sale


SILVANA vintage antique Swiss wristwatch
BLACK DIAL
CRYSTAL IS CLEAN WITH NO CRACK. oNLY GOT MINOR SCRATCH
THE 21 JEWEL MANUAL MOVEMENT BY SILVANA WATCH CO.
STAINLESS STEEL CASE
EXCLUDING THE CROWN AND 30mm LUG TO LUG
UNSIGNED CROWN
STAINLESS STEEL FLEXI BAND FITS 8.5" WRIST
DISCONTINUED MODEL... RARE!
EXCELLENT CONDITION, KEEPING TIME AND RECENTLY SERVICED

I DO NOT KNOW THE EXACT VALUE OF THIS WATCH. BUT GOT YELLOW METAL TOP ON WATCH. I NEVER VERIFY WHETHER IT IS GOLD OR NOT.
sORRY THE PICTURE QUALITY IS NO GOOD DUE TO I DO NOT HAVE A GOOD CAMERA
PRICE:RM180 FIRM


Silvana brief history:

silvana watch: First references of the Silvana watch brand name can be traced back to the 19th Century. For example, the book "Armbanduhren" ("Watches") by Gisbert L. Brunner, indicates the date of foundation as 1868. Minutes of the "Association Cantonale Bernoise de Fabricants d'Horlogerie" state that Silvana envolved from the split of the A. Reymond S.A., Tramelan. The Manufacture d'Horlogerie A. Reymond S.A. was founded in 1898. Therefore the first Silvana watches were made already in the 19th Century ... a quite remarkable fact which places Silvana among the oldest Swiss watch brands. The registration of the watch factory Silvana S.A. took place on 24 May 1923 in the Commercial Registry of Courtelary, domiciled in Tramelan. At that time the company employed approximately 70 people. In the same year the Silvana factory was admitted to the "Association Cantonale Bernoise des Fabricants d'Horlogerie" as an independent member. In 1929 Silvana merged with the traditional and then famous watch factory H. Gasser & Co. from Bienne and on 17 February 1931, Silvana S.A. moved their offices and production to Bienne. Until 1935, Silvana watches were produced at H. Gasser & Co. On 27 December 1935, Silvana transferred their activities back to their origins to the charming village of Tramelan in the Swiss Jura.Between 1936 and 1969, the watch factory Silvana S.A. developed continously and in the 1960's business expanded gradually and turnover increased year over year. Silvana's markets were not only restricted to Europe, Silvana products were very popular also in South America, in the Middle East and the Caribbean. Both the distribution and sales were organized out of the company's own offices in Bienne. Silvana was very successful with their lines of pocket watches during 1940 - 1970, with motifs such as "La Montre Paysan", "La Montre Chasseur" or the special edition "Chemin de Fer Turc" graved on the back of the watch. A special diving watch was very well sold in South America and the Caribbean during the 1960's. In 1969 the owner of the watch factory Silvana S.A. joined with an industrialist from Neuchâtel, who aready possessed the brands "Avia", "Helvetia" and "Fleurier Watch". This cooperation resulted in the firm Avia & Silvana S.A., which soon thereafter was integrated into the holding company of the Societe des Garde-Temps S.A. SGT, a conglomerate, which, besides owning various prestigious watch brands, ran subsidiaries in Switzerland and abroad and wrote turnovers of over 100 million Swiss Francs per year. In July of 1982, SGT sold the brand Silvana to a commercial firm in Bienne and on 27 February 1992, Silvana AG was founded and registered in the Commercial Registry of Zurich. It is through the guidance of this company, that the spirit of a century old craftsmanship, honouring the high quality standards of famous Swiss watchmaking will lead the Silvana brand to new heights.

Jade stone sculpture - flower tree




I bought this jade stone when I visit China on Sept 2004. The weight of this carved jade stone is about 2kg (I do not weight, it just estimation). This is challenging task to bring this stone to Malaysia since I have to handcarry this stone carefully in order to preserved it from crack or damaged and considerably heavy also. It is very tiring journey. Anyway I'm happy this stone is finaly reach their final destination- my sweet home


History of Jade

[edit] Prehistoric and historic China
Main article: Chinese jade

Jade dragon, Western Han Dynasty (202 BC – 9 AD)During Neolithic times, the key known sources of nephrite jade in China for utilitarian and ceremonial jade items were the now depleted deposits in the Ningshao area in the Yangtze River Delta (Liangzhu culture 3400–2250 BC) and in an area of the Liaoning province and Inner Mongolia (Hongshan culture 4700–2200 BC).[5] As early as 6000 BC Dushan Jade was being mined. In the Yin Ruins of Shang Dynasty (1600 BC to 1050 BC) in Anyang, Dushan Jade ornaments was dug up in the tomb of the Shang kings. Jade was used to create many utilitarian and ceremonial objects, ranging from indoor decorative items to jade burial suits. Jade was considered the "imperial gem". From about the earliest Chinese dynasties until present, the jade deposits in most use were not only from the region of Khotan in the Western Chinese province of Xinjiang but also from other parts of China, such as Lantian, Shaanxi. There, white and greenish nephrite jade is found in small quarries and as pebbles and boulders in the rivers flowing from the Kuen-Lun mountain range eastward into the Takla-Makan desert area. River jade collection was concentrated in the Yarkand, the White Jades (Yurungkash) and Black Jade (Karakash) Rivers. From the Kingdom of Khotan, on the southern leg of the Silk Road, yearly tribute payments consisting of the most precious white jade were made to the Chinese Imperial court and there transformed into objets d'art by skilled artisans as jade was considered more valuable than gold or silver. Jade became a favorite material for the crafting of Chinese scholars objects, such as rests for calligraphy brushes, as well as the mouthpieces of some opium pipes, due to the belief that breathing through jade would bestow longevity upon smokers who used such a pipe.[6]

Jadeite, with its bright emerald-green, pink, lavender, orange and brown colours was imported from Burma to China only after about 1800. The vivid green variety became known as Feicui (翡翠) or Kingfisher (feathers) Jade. It quickly replaced nephrite as the imperial variety of jade.

In the history of the art of the Chinese empire, jade has had a special significance, comparable with that of gold and diamonds in the West.[7] Jade was used for the finest objects and cult figures, and for grave furnishings for high-ranking members of the imperial family.[7]

[edit] Prehistoric and historic India
The Jainist temple of Kolanpak in the Nalgonda district, Andhra Pradesh, India is home to a 5-foot (1.5 m) high sculpture of Mahavira that is carved entirely out of jade. It is the largest sculpture made from a single jade rock in the world.

[edit] Prehistoric and early historic Korea

Korean National Treasure No. 191, a gold crown with comma-shaped jades, was excavated from the Heavenly Horse Tomb of Silla and dates to the 5th century AD.The use of jade and other greenstone was a long-term tradition in Korea (c. 850 BC – AD 668). Jade is found in small numbers of pit-houses and burials. The craft production of small comma-shaped and tubular 'jades' using materials such as jade, microcline, jasper, etc in southern Korea originates from the Middle Mumun Pottery Period (c. 850–550 BC).[8] Comma-shaped jades are found on some of the gold crowns of Silla royalty (c. AD 300/400–668) and sumptuous elite burials of the Korean Three Kingdoms. After the state of Silla united the Korean Peninsula in AD 668, the widespread popularisation of death rituals related to Buddhism resulted in the decline of the use of jade in burials as prestige mortuary goods.

[edit] Māori
Nephrite jade in New Zealand is known as pounamu in the Māori language (often called "greenstone" in New Zealand English) which plays an important role in Māori culture. It is considered a taonga, or treasure, and therefore protected under the Treaty of Waitangi, and the exploitation of it is restricted and closely monitored. It is found only in the South Island of New Zealand, known as Te Wai Pounamu in Māori—"The [land of] Greenstone Water", or Te Wahi Pounamu—"The Place of Greenstone".

Tools, weapons and ornaments were made of it; in particular adzes, the 'mere' (short club), and the Hei-tiki (neck pendant). These were believed to have their own mana, handed down as valuable heirlooms, and often given as gifts to seal important agreements. Nephrite jewellery of Maori design is widely popular with locals and tourists, although some of the jade used for these is now imported from British Columbia and elsewhere.[9]

[edit] Mesoamerica
Main article: Jade use in Mesoamerica

Jadeite Pectoral from the Mayan Classic period (195 mm/7.7 in high)

Jade was a rare and valued material in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. The only source from which the various indigenous cultures, such as the Olmec and Maya, for example, could obtain jade was located in the Motagua River valley in Guatemala. Jade was largely an elite good, and was usually carved in a variety ways, whether serving as a medium upon which hieroglyphs were inscribed, or shaped into symbolic figurines. Generally, the material was highly symbolic, and it was often employed in the performance of ideological practices and rituals.

[edit] Faux jade
This section does not cite any references or sources.
Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2009)

Many minerals are sold as jade. Some of these are: serpentine (also bowenite), carnelian, aventurine quartz, glass, grossularite, Vesuvianite, soapstone (and other steatites such as shoushan stone) and recently, Australian chrysoprase. "Korean jade," "Suzhou jade," "Styrian jade," "Olive jade", and "New jade" are all really serpentine; "Transvaal jade" or "African jade" is grossularite; "Peace jade" is a mixture of serpentine, stichtite, and quartz; "Mountain jade" is dyed dolomite marble.

In almost all dictionaries, the Chinese character 'yù' (玉) is translated into English as 'jade'. However, this frequently leads to misunderstanding: Chinese, Koreans, and Westerners alike generally fail to appreciate that the cultural concept of 'jade' is considerably broader in China and Korea than in the West. A more accurate translation for this character on its own would be 'precious/ornamental rock'. It is seldom, if ever, used on its own to denote 'true' jade in Mandarin Chinese; for example, one would normally refer to 'ying yu' (硬玉, 'hard jade') for jadeite, or 'ruan yu' (軟玉, 'soft jade') for nephrite. The Chinese names for many ornamental non-jade rocks also incorporate the character 'yù', and it is widely understood by native speakers that such stones are not, in fact, true precious nephrite or jadeite. Even so, for commercial reasons, the names of such stones may well still be translated into English as 'jade', and this practice continues to confuse the unwary.

Faux jades are sold to the public as inexpensive jewelry or beads. Nephrite and jadeite are sold at fine jewelers for considerably higher prices than semiprecious faux jades, which come from lower end stores. Reputable merchants can provide the scientific name of specific "jade" stones upon request, although clerks who vend faux jades may be unaware that multiple types of stone are sold under that name.

[edit] Enhancement
Jade may be enhanced (sometimes called "stabilized"). Note that some merchants will refer to these as Grades, but it is important to bear in mind that degree of enhancement is different from colour and texture quality. In other words, Type A jadeite is not enhanced but can have poor colour and texture. There are three main methods of enhancement, sometimes referred to as the ABC Treatment System:

Type A jadeite has not been treated in any way except surface waxing.
Type B treatment involves exposing a promising but stained piece of jadeite to chemical bleaches and/or acids and impregnating it with a clear polymer resin. This results in a significant improvement of transparency and colour of the material. Currently, infrared spectroscopy is the most accurate test for the detection of polymer in jadeite.
Type C jade has been artificially stained or dyed. The red colour of Red jade can be enhanced with heat. The effects are somewhat uncontrollable and may result in a dull brown. In any case, translucency is usually lost.
B+C jade is a combination of B and C: it has been both artificially dyed AND impregnated.
Type D jade refers to a composite stone such as a doublet comprising a jade top with a plastic backing.[10

Jade Stone carving sculpture -Cabbage





This cabbage is made from original jade stone not from fibre or fake manmade stone. It is beutifully carved by profesional and handmade not mass production and the design is totally exclusive (you will never find the same design in the market). This is a good feng shui for the believers. I do not measure the exact weight, but it is quite heavy (maybe 2 to 3 kg or more)


History of Jade

[edit] Prehistoric and historic China
Main article: Chinese jade

Jade dragon, Western Han Dynasty (202 BC – 9 AD)During Neolithic times, the key known sources of nephrite jade in China for utilitarian and ceremonial jade items were the now depleted deposits in the Ningshao area in the Yangtze River Delta (Liangzhu culture 3400–2250 BC) and in an area of the Liaoning province and Inner Mongolia (Hongshan culture 4700–2200 BC).[5] As early as 6000 BC Dushan Jade was being mined. In the Yin Ruins of Shang Dynasty (1600 BC to 1050 BC) in Anyang, Dushan Jade ornaments was dug up in the tomb of the Shang kings. Jade was used to create many utilitarian and ceremonial objects, ranging from indoor decorative items to jade burial suits. Jade was considered the "imperial gem". From about the earliest Chinese dynasties until present, the jade deposits in most use were not only from the region of Khotan in the Western Chinese province of Xinjiang but also from other parts of China, such as Lantian, Shaanxi. There, white and greenish nephrite jade is found in small quarries and as pebbles and boulders in the rivers flowing from the Kuen-Lun mountain range eastward into the Takla-Makan desert area. River jade collection was concentrated in the Yarkand, the White Jades (Yurungkash) and Black Jade (Karakash) Rivers. From the Kingdom of Khotan, on the southern leg of the Silk Road, yearly tribute payments consisting of the most precious white jade were made to the Chinese Imperial court and there transformed into objets d'art by skilled artisans as jade was considered more valuable than gold or silver. Jade became a favorite material for the crafting of Chinese scholars objects, such as rests for calligraphy brushes, as well as the mouthpieces of some opium pipes, due to the belief that breathing through jade would bestow longevity upon smokers who used such a pipe.[6]

Jadeite, with its bright emerald-green, pink, lavender, orange and brown colours was imported from Burma to China only after about 1800. The vivid green variety became known as Feicui (翡翠) or Kingfisher (feathers) Jade. It quickly replaced nephrite as the imperial variety of jade.

In the history of the art of the Chinese empire, jade has had a special significance, comparable with that of gold and diamonds in the West.[7] Jade was used for the finest objects and cult figures, and for grave furnishings for high-ranking members of the imperial family.[7]

[edit] Prehistoric and historic India
The Jainist temple of Kolanpak in the Nalgonda district, Andhra Pradesh, India is home to a 5-foot (1.5 m) high sculpture of Mahavira that is carved entirely out of jade. It is the largest sculpture made from a single jade rock in the world.

[edit] Prehistoric and early historic Korea

Korean National Treasure No. 191, a gold crown with comma-shaped jades, was excavated from the Heavenly Horse Tomb of Silla and dates to the 5th century AD.The use of jade and other greenstone was a long-term tradition in Korea (c. 850 BC – AD 668). Jade is found in small numbers of pit-houses and burials. The craft production of small comma-shaped and tubular 'jades' using materials such as jade, microcline, jasper, etc in southern Korea originates from the Middle Mumun Pottery Period (c. 850–550 BC).[8] Comma-shaped jades are found on some of the gold crowns of Silla royalty (c. AD 300/400–668) and sumptuous elite burials of the Korean Three Kingdoms. After the state of Silla united the Korean Peninsula in AD 668, the widespread popularisation of death rituals related to Buddhism resulted in the decline of the use of jade in burials as prestige mortuary goods.

[edit] Māori
Nephrite jade in New Zealand is known as pounamu in the Māori language (often called "greenstone" in New Zealand English) which plays an important role in Māori culture. It is considered a taonga, or treasure, and therefore protected under the Treaty of Waitangi, and the exploitation of it is restricted and closely monitored. It is found only in the South Island of New Zealand, known as Te Wai Pounamu in Māori—"The [land of] Greenstone Water", or Te Wahi Pounamu—"The Place of Greenstone".

Tools, weapons and ornaments were made of it; in particular adzes, the 'mere' (short club), and the Hei-tiki (neck pendant). These were believed to have their own mana, handed down as valuable heirlooms, and often given as gifts to seal important agreements. Nephrite jewellery of Maori design is widely popular with locals and tourists, although some of the jade used for these is now imported from British Columbia and elsewhere.[9]

[edit] Mesoamerica
Main article: Jade use in Mesoamerica

Jadeite Pectoral from the Mayan Classic period (195 mm/7.7 in high)

Jade was a rare and valued material in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. The only source from which the various indigenous cultures, such as the Olmec and Maya, for example, could obtain jade was located in the Motagua River valley in Guatemala. Jade was largely an elite good, and was usually carved in a variety ways, whether serving as a medium upon which hieroglyphs were inscribed, or shaped into symbolic figurines. Generally, the material was highly symbolic, and it was often employed in the performance of ideological practices and rituals.

[edit] Faux jade
This section does not cite any references or sources.
Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2009)

Many minerals are sold as jade. Some of these are: serpentine (also bowenite), carnelian, aventurine quartz, glass, grossularite, Vesuvianite, soapstone (and other steatites such as shoushan stone) and recently, Australian chrysoprase. "Korean jade," "Suzhou jade," "Styrian jade," "Olive jade", and "New jade" are all really serpentine; "Transvaal jade" or "African jade" is grossularite; "Peace jade" is a mixture of serpentine, stichtite, and quartz; "Mountain jade" is dyed dolomite marble.

In almost all dictionaries, the Chinese character 'yù' (玉) is translated into English as 'jade'. However, this frequently leads to misunderstanding: Chinese, Koreans, and Westerners alike generally fail to appreciate that the cultural concept of 'jade' is considerably broader in China and Korea than in the West. A more accurate translation for this character on its own would be 'precious/ornamental rock'. It is seldom, if ever, used on its own to denote 'true' jade in Mandarin Chinese; for example, one would normally refer to 'ying yu' (硬玉, 'hard jade') for jadeite, or 'ruan yu' (軟玉, 'soft jade') for nephrite. The Chinese names for many ornamental non-jade rocks also incorporate the character 'yù', and it is widely understood by native speakers that such stones are not, in fact, true precious nephrite or jadeite. Even so, for commercial reasons, the names of such stones may well still be translated into English as 'jade', and this practice continues to confuse the unwary.

Faux jades are sold to the public as inexpensive jewelry or beads. Nephrite and jadeite are sold at fine jewelers for considerably higher prices than semiprecious faux jades, which come from lower end stores. Reputable merchants can provide the scientific name of specific "jade" stones upon request, although clerks who vend faux jades may be unaware that multiple types of stone are sold under that name.

[edit] Enhancement
Jade may be enhanced (sometimes called "stabilized"). Note that some merchants will refer to these as Grades, but it is important to bear in mind that degree of enhancement is different from colour and texture quality. In other words, Type A jadeite is not enhanced but can have poor colour and texture. There are three main methods of enhancement, sometimes referred to as the ABC Treatment System:

Type A jadeite has not been treated in any way except surface waxing.
Type B treatment involves exposing a promising but stained piece of jadeite to chemical bleaches and/or acids and impregnating it with a clear polymer resin. This results in a significant improvement of transparency and colour of the material. Currently, infrared spectroscopy is the most accurate test for the detection of polymer in jadeite.
Type C jade has been artificially stained or dyed. The red colour of Red jade can be enhanced with heat. The effects are somewhat uncontrollable and may result in a dull brown. In any case, translucency is usually lost.
B+C jade is a combination of B and C: it has been both artificially dyed AND impregnated.
Type D jade refers to a composite stone such as a doublet comprising a jade top with a plastic backing.[10

Thursday, April 22, 2010

This cuckoo is from Rythm




31st July 2010 - Sold to anonymous from Penang, Malaysia

This cuckoo is from Rythm. The birds also will move in and out when the alarm starts. This is a quartz type clock(using battery)





Brief history of Rhythm clock Co.

RHYTHM WATCH CO., LTD. was established in 1950. Over the years, we have developed into a world leader in the manufacturing of time keeping products with the production of approximately 20,000,000 clocks and movements sold throughout the world.

RHYTHM is set apart from the rest of the industry by its investment in the development of state-of-the-art features. Keeping in mind the needs of you, the retailer, RHYTHM has developed features and designs that meet the needs of today's lifestyle with motion and sound that attracts the consumer.

Since RHYTHM is a vertically integrated manufacturing company, we make what we sell. Total quality control is enforced from design concept right through the entire manufacturing process. This assures you and your customers of a quality time piece from RHYTHM.

RHYTHM is a worldwide company that has a reputation for quality and design. We look forward to developing a strong business relationship with your company.

HISTORY

1950 - RHYTHM WATCH CO., LTD. was established with one factory. Head office located in Tokyo. Manufactured alarm, table, and music box clocks.

1952 - RHYTHM WATCH CO., LTD. was awarded the M.I.T.I., the highest timepiece quality award by the Government of Japan.

1958 - Company was awarded the M.I.T.I. again.

1963 - Developed first plastic parts to be used in quartz movements in Japan. Was registered in the Tokyo Stock Exchange.

1965 - Developed and marketed automobile clock.

1972 - RHYTHM took the number one position in the world for clock production.

1976 - Developed the first Quartz Alarm clock movement in the world powered with a small battery. Alarm clock design selected best in Japan.

1982 - Awarded the Deming Prize for company-wide quality control. This is a world wide competition. Only 61 Japanese companies have won this honor since its establishment.

1989 - RHYTHM U.S.A., INC. was incorporated.

1990 - RHYWACO (H. K.) CO., LTD. was incorporated.

1991 - RHYTHM INDUSTRIAL (H. K.) CO., LTD. was incorporated.

1996 - KOREA RHYTHM was incorporated.

2003 - The home office of RHYTHM WATCH CO., LTD. was moved to Saitama, Japan.
.

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Cuckoo clock collection 1 -Citizen



14th Aug 2010:Sold to Mr Ahmed from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

This cuckoo clock is made in Japan. (by Citizen)

The most fun enjoyable time about this clock is when the bird sounds and move in and out from the clock




Cuckoo Clock History


If you ask most of the people, who own a Cuckoo Clock hanging in one of their rooms about its history, chances are high that you will get “I don’t know” or maybe a few statements where they bought it. To help you out here, we sum up a short summary for you about the history and the tradition of this well-known clock.

The first so called “Black Forest Cuckoo Clock” was created over 280 years ago - around 1630 - in the village of Triberg, the Black Forest Region in Germany. Even if some sources say something different but most times Mr Franz Kettler was the person, who is brought directly into connection with the birth of the clock. But the story of the clock reaches even more back than this. It must have happened around 1630 that a peddler who sold glass from the Black Forest to foreign countries, returned with a clock, perhaps from the land of Böhmen (today's Czech Republic). So the technique and the idea was born somewhere different – but the Cuckoo Clock as we know it today comes form the Black Forest.

Somebody in the Black Forest, maybe Mr. Kettler, must have been fascinated by this idea, that kept time much better than the hourglass, that were used at that time. So, this person built his own clock, and started the tradition of clock making.

It did not take long for the Cuckoo Clock to gain incredible popularity within certain parts of Germany – even some major cities nearby. During those long winter months, the farms were snowed-in and the people had time to create finely hand-crafted cuckoo clocks of many styles with rich and varied carvings. The citizens even compete against each other for the best clock. People there had always crafted and carved using the local wood that was one of the few natural resources in the area. Each of them would try to create a more unique and detailed cuckoo clock than their neighbor’s clock.

With cleverness and dexterity, the clock makers were making cuckoo clocks with richly hand-carved decorations from various woods. In 1808 there were already 688 clockmakers and 582 clock peddlars in the districts of Triberg and Neustadt. It is known for example that in 1808 in Triberg, and the surrounding villages, 790 of 9013 inhabitants were involved in the clock-making. When Spring came around again; they would take their cuckoo clocks to town and display them.

That is the season when they would show off their hard work and sell their cuckoos to admirers.
In 1850 the Herzog (Duke) of Baden founded a School for clock-making in Furtwangen, where students learned math and drawing as well as making cases and movements for the clocks.

Thus the first clocks were rather primitive, the cuckoo clock was at that time really a piece of art – detailed crafted and featured by a hand carved cuckoo bird which was animated by various weights and pendulums. They used toothed wheels made of wood and simple stones as weights. Instead of a pendulum, they used a piece of wood called a "Waag" that moved forward and back above the clock dial, to make the clock keep time.

The so-called "Häuslers" where the people who made clocks at that time. They were not rich farmers, but clock making was a welcome way for them to earn a little money. In the Black Forest area, usually the oldest son of a farmer inherited the farm – the younger ones only got a small piece of land. So they were forced to look out for new ways to earn their living. Around 1690 a whole industry of clock making had developed in the high Black Forest.

When time went by people in the Black Forest continued to improve their techniques to produce clocks. Clock-peddlers travelling to different regions heard about new technologies which were developed in other regions. In the 17th century Friedrich Dilger from the small village of Urach went to France and brought back new ideas and tools in building clocks.

So people in the Black Forest began to specialize in certain aspects of clock making like carvers - making the cases -, painters and manufacturers of chains and toothed wheels. Others concentrated on new details like moving figures. In 1738 Franz Ketterer from the village of Schönwald was the first to build a cuckoo for his clocks. So the famous bird with the original sound “cuckoo cuckoo” was born.

At the same time there were large artist's clocks with a calling rooster in towns like Prague, Heilbronn, Berne and Strasbourg. Maybe they were the inspiration for Ketterer to build his cuckoo clock. Making a clock call like a cuckoo was easier than making it call like a rooster, but still it must have been quite difficult to develop this. The call of the cuckoo was made the same way it is today: two bellows send air through pipes. A similar technology was already in use for church-organs at this time.
The most valuable Black Forest clock is the "world-time-clock", which was built in 1787. It is located today in the German clock museum in Furtwangen.

One last thing that is important to be mentioned in this context is the origin of the "Bahnhäusle" clocks. When building the Railroad through the rocky Black Forest area around 1860, it was necessary to build many tunnels. For this, skilled tunnel-builders from Italy were hired, and they brought their way of life as well as their architecture with them. Alongside the railroad, lookout buildings were made, the so-called "Bahnwärterhäusles" which show the foreign influence. Adorned with wild grape vines, they were the inspiration for this special type of cuckoo clocks.
This ancient craft continued to develop, becoming soon a flourishing industry. The poorly lit spaces where the clock carvers worked have become light and well-equipped workshops where clock movements and cases are manufactured by modern methods. But the woodcarvings are still handmade by skilled masters as they were 200 years ago. Old clocks and original drawings of the first clocks are still used and modified as patterns for new models, but the cuckoo clock in its basic form is 200 years old. The cuckoo clock is a clock of the past, present and the future, still much loved by children and grandchildren.


Citizen brief history

For almost eight decades, Citizen has been ahead of its time. Our brand has always stood for innovations and high precision that make life better for everyday people and now we are raising our sights to meet the needs of the new Millennium.

Our History
Our beginnings go back to 1924, when Citizen's forerunner, the Shokosha Watch Research Watch Institute produced its first pocket watch the "CITIZEN". The then Mayor of Tokyo, Mr Shimpei Goto, named the watch "CITIZEN" with the hope that the watch, a luxury item of those times, would become widely available to ordinary citizens and be sold throughout the world.

Time and again Citizen has pioneered groundbreaking technologies and helped to make watches an indispensable part of modern life. Introduced in 1956, Parashock was the first shock resistant watch made by a Japanese manufacturer. And three years later, Parawater was hailed as the country's first water resistant watch.

One of the latest milestones is our Eco-Drive system. Bringing new thinking to the art of watchmaking, this is a light powered solution that eliminates the need to change batteries - a revolution that made it the first watch technology to receive the Japan Environment Association's Eco Mark for environmentally friendly products.

And in 2003, Citizen continues to evolve and be ahead of its time with the launch of Stiletto. This is the World's thinnest light powered watch - a watch so revolutionary it combines eco-drive technology with a refined, sleek and sophisticated case and bracelet from 4.4mm thick.

Citizen is, however more diverse then simply watches. In fact watches only represent less than 40% of the company's business. Today we are drawing on a heritage of proven quality and technologies as we develop the market for watches, clocks, jewellery, eyeglass frames and health care products.

The Citizen Watch Company, Ltd. was established in 1930 and Citizen Watches Australia (CWA) was established in May 1965. CWA operates across Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the South Pacific Islands. Head office is located in Frenchs Forest, NSW.

Citizen believes that delivering excellence is the key to building successful partnerships with retailers and consumers alike. Excellence in product, marketing and service is paramount, and the resources required to achieve excellence are viewed as investments, not costs.

Citizen looks forward to the challenges that the future will no doubt bring. Our guarantee is a commitment to continually strive and work towards an even more successful future for our retailers and consumers. Ready for further growth and progress, we are working harder than ever to explore new directions and contribute to changing lifestyles.

Monday, April 19, 2010

Mantle clock collection - Mauthe (3 holes)



2nd July 2010-Sold to mr Smith from Singapore


This mantle clock is made in Germany.Brand name: Mauthe. Also got 3 holes which chime every quarters. The Mahogany woods is still looking very shining and looks like new even though already more than 50 years old



Mauthe brief History

Friedrich Mauthe (June 02, 1822 - February 02, 1884) started a small clock factory in Schwenningen in 1870 and by 1899 the firm was also making its own cases. The Mauthe Clock Company started as a general supplier for clockmakers tools and equipment. Mauthe accepted clocks on a barter system. As the demand for clocks grew, Mauthe started his own manufacturing enterprise in 1876. His sons Christian and Jacob joined the family enterprise in 1876. In 1886 the Mauthe factory started her own spring drawing facilities. In 1899 a case factory was added, by 1900, 1000 employees were on the payroll. In 1915 Mauthe added their own sawmill and milling shop. In 1923 the year of inflation made competition for Mauthe tough. In 1930 2000 workers produced 45,000 clocks and watches a week. By 1923, 60% German clocks exported to London were Mauthe. In 1970, Mauthe struggled for survival, and in 1975 the company was in receivership and forced to close in 1976.

Mantle clock collections-Junghan (3 holes)


 2nd July 2010-Sold to mr Smith from Singapore

This table clock or mantle clock is made in Germany. The brand name is Junghan, a reputable german clock company. This clock has 3 holes for winding. It will chime every quarter. I bought this clock a few years back in Ipoh, Perak for RM900. The price is a bit at high side, but it is a grab since it only has one owner since new and no repair needed.



Junghan Clock brief history

The original antique Junghans Clocks company began in 1861 when Erhard Junghan and his brother-in-law, Jakob Zeller-Tobler set up their Black Forest business in the town of Schramberg. Complete clocks were not on the menu from the two partners until later in 1866, instead the new business concentrated its efforts on making clock parts. Selling these parts to other clock makers allowed the partners to build up enough capital to embark on the design and manufacture of their first clocks.
The company grew rapidly from the original parts business and after Erhard passed away in 1870 the business was taken over by his two sons; Arthur and Erhard Jr. The two brothers expanded production and by the turn of the century the production of antique Junghans Clocks had surpassed all other clock makers in Germany, becoming the largest clock maker not just in Germany, but in the world.

Branding played an important part in the Junghans success. In 1890 Junghans designed an eight-point star as their trademark, something that has lasted to this day. In 1903 they employed over 3000 people and made over 3 million timepieces each year. Such was the innovation of the company that a special building was constructed in to the mountain side, a terraced building that allowed natural sunlight to flood into each and every workstation. Today this building is a listed historic building.

Arthur was succeeded by his two sons, Erwin and Oscar in 1920 who once again accepted the challenge of not only improving the business, but also continuing the legacy of innovation that was a characteristic of the Junghans business. New and exciting developments in watch making were introduced; namely wristwatches and complicated watch movements in the 1930s and 1940s.

Their antique Junghans Clocks were superbly designed and built. Hardwood cases made from Oak were some of their best, many of them having ornate engravings in the wood. Electric clocks were introduced in the 1960s, these proved very popular and many can still be found today in excellent condition.

Some of the more popular antique Junghans Clock models you are likely to find are the "Elephant Swing", "Bat Boy Swing", "Monkey Business", "Onion Boy" and "Onion Boy Swing". There are about 30 different models of Junghans clocks to collect.

Sunday, April 18, 2010

Others table clock collections







I have a vast of 3 in 1 alarm clock and normal alarm clock collection. Brand as Big Ben, Kienzler, Wehrle etc made in germany, Swiss,england and China. All keeping time and good condition. I think most of it more 30 years old. But I enjoyed keeping all the clock as my personal collection. For me time is gold. It also remind me that I will never young again. I will keep keeping as long as I find a good condition clock with the right price and I will never regret keeping

it.

400 days table clock collection - Keinzle

A


This clock call 400days due to it not required for manual windings in order to move (do not use any battery). It just use 4 balls that rotate clockwise and counterclockwise automatically with the help of gravity. I really appreciate this germany technology. It can move more than years without stop. The brand is Kienzler. Some people call this type of watch is Dome or Anniversary watch. Anybody have experience of this clock technology can share it with me.




Kienzle brief history

KIENZLE Uhren GmbH is one of Germanys oldest watch labels and combines tradition, modern design and quality in all watch collections. Founded in 1822 in Schwenningen, the company headquarters in Hamburg since 2002.

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Present
3 Watch collection
4 Corporate philosophy
5 Sponsoring
6 References
7 External links


[edit] History
KIENZLE is founded in 1822 in Schwenningen by Johannes Schlenker. The company soon fabricates 20,000 wall clocks and pendulum clocks per annum.[1][2] In 1883 Jakob Kienzle marries into the Schlenker family and hencefoward he contributes to the expansion of the company. In 1893, 162,000 watches and alarm clocks are made per annum. The name of the company is changed into Schlenker & KIENZLE.

From 1894 on the weight and the costs of alarm clocks and wall clocks can be significantly reduced incorporating the "American System" with standardised individual components and perforated plates. This process is highly innovative at that time. From 1897 on Jakob Kienzle becomes sole owner and also the name of the company changes after some time into today's notation KIENZLE. But not only the watch production is continuously extended and modernised. The international activities are also steadily enlarged. In the following years branches in Milan, Paris and London are established.[3]

In 1900 KIENZLE launches the time stamp clock on the market, followed by inexpensive pocket watches, travelling clocks and wristwatches for ladies. The first clocks for automobiles are also made at that period of time. The so-called "Strapazier-Armbanduhr" is presented in 1931. This watch is extremely resilient because of its special construction. With 25 million sold specimens the watch model becomes a popular product.[4]

At the end of the nineteen-thirties KIENZLE starts the fabrication of two table clocks in the upper price segment: the Zodiac Clock and the World Time Clock. After the Second World War the track record of KIENZLE goes on again with established articles and new products like a parking meter equipped with the latest technology. 1956 the so-called "Volksautomatik" enters the market and is yet another example for the innovative products of the company. Energy is provided by a rotor that wounds in both directions and instead of steel pins the lever is fitted with ruby pins.[5]

In the sixties and seventies KIENZLE becomes market leader in Germany. 1972 the first solar watch named "Heliomat" is produced as well as the first quartz movements.[6] In the following years KIENZLE is the first company to present a quartz travel alarm clock.[7]

The 1986 developed solar watch with light conditions and polycrystalline solar generator represents a novelty. At the beginning of the nineties KIENZLE fabricates the most water-resistant watch in the world with a water-resistance level up to 12,000 meters and presents the world's first radio-controlled "satellite" alarm clock with an analogue waking time setting.

1996 a new radio-controlled movement is perfected: the smallest dual-motor, radio-controlled movement with the fastest setting system. This movement displays the right time within just five minutes and is a world innovation.[8]

[edit] Present
In 1997 KIENZLE is taken over by the Highway Holdings Group. But only five years later in 2002 KIENZLE returns to Germany with the establishment of KIENZLE AG. Since that time the headquarters is located in Hamburg and KIENZLE finds back to old success.[9] The company purchases the worldwide brand and distribution rights and begins with the development and fabrication of three new watch collections in different price segments.[10]

In 2008 KIENZLE moves into the current headquarters, a time honoured merchant's house in Hamburg-Harvestehude, which perfectly represents the company and its values: quality, tradition and innovation.[11][12]

In the future KIENZLE extends to a medium-sized lifestyle brand. KIENZLE OPTIK is the first expansion segment to be launched on the market. However watches and clocks will remain the core area of the brand.[10]

[edit] Watch collection

Edition Jakob Kienzle #4The watch collection of the company includes numerous models in different price segments. Based on the corporate philosophy KIENZLE designs and produces distinctive watches for discerning individuals.[13]

"KIENZLE KLASSIK" covers the entry price level while "KIENZLE 1822" handles the mid-price segment and the "EDITION JAKOB KIENZLE" meets highest demands. Alongside there are alarm clocks and wall clocks as ever.[14]

"KIENZLE KLASSIK" and "KIENZLE 1822" are similar in their classification. "KIENZLE KLASSIK" is structured in Mechanics, Sports, Elegance, Classical, Satellite and pocket watches. The design is up-to-date and diversified with different case shapes and dials.[15]

The name "KIENZLE 1822" is leaned on the founding year of the company and handles the mid-price segment. The five classifications are called Mechanics, Sports, Luxury, Retro and pocket watches. These models are distinguishable from each other through different mechanical movements and designs. The collection "Retro" exhibits classical design and robust mechanical calibres. The collection "Sports" is a contrast by incorporating dynamic and action. Typical is for example the use of steel bracelets in place of leather.[16]

The "EDITION JAKOB KIENZLE" meets the highest demands and is the highlight of the watch collection. Eight luxurious models with different complications can be distinguished. The watches are numbered and do not have a special name. Watch "No.3" is characterised by a 52-week display, while "No.4" has a perpetual calendar and "No.5" is available with a moon phase.[17] The design is traditional and complies outstanding watchmaking.[18]

The "EDITION COLOR" is the latest collection of the brand and comes along with fresh colours on the inside of the leather straps.[1] Most of the models are "Made in Germany".[19]

[edit] Corporate philosophy
The company is one of Germanys oldest watch labels with almost 200 years of company history. KIENZLE is more than a watch label - KIENZLE is German contemporary history and the new innovative collections are based on the great past.

Quality and classical elegance are combined with uncommon design elements and innovative technology. The values of the company, tradition, innovation, accuracy and a great price-performance ratio are recognisable in all collections.[20]

[edit] Sponsoring
Since the last decades KIENZLE regularly conveys different sponsoring projects whereas the focus is on sport. In 1992 Katja Seizinger was supported doing the Olympic Games.[21]

In the last years KIENZLE sponsored the SG Flensburg-Handewitt. From the season 2009/2010 KIENZLE will be official partner of the Hamburg sports club and will support the Bundesliga-watch in the arena.

But also social projects are important to the company. KIENZLE supports the Hamburg Leuchtfeuer Hospiz which is under the patronage of Hamburg mayor Ole von Beust.[22][23]


History of Torsion Suspension Clocks

The invention of the Torsion Suspension Clock can be attributed to an American named Aaron Crane. In 1841, Crane , a resident of Newark, New Jersey patented his idea for a clock using a torsion pendulum. He successfully made torsion clocks that would run for eight or thirty days, or some for a period of one year without winding. Crane also developed an astronomical clock based on the torsion suspension patent, but only four were made. Several of Crane’s original clocks are still in existence today.

Although two other Americans, Silas B. Terry of Plymouth, Connecticut and John Hile of Waterville, Kansas also patented torsion suspension movements in the 1800's, none of them proved to be very successful or popular.

It was not until approximately 1879/1880 that a German by the name of Anton Harder was granted a patent for a torsion suspension clock. His inspiration came about when he watched a servant turning a chandelier to ignite the last candle. When he released the lamp it swung back and forth. Harder visualized the principle of the rotation of mass, and figured he could make a clock that would run for a long period of time using this motion. Harder soon developed and patented a clock movement from this idea.

In 1880, Harder got together with some of his workers including one August Schatz, and they formed Jahresuhrenfabrik or Year Clock Factory, and began to seriously work on developing a torsion suspension clock that would run for a year with one winding, and be an accurate timekeeper. The clock was indeed developed and would run for a year, but the timekeeping accuracy of the clock left much to be desired.

In 1884, Harder sold his patent to one F.A..L. deGruyter of Amsterdam who continued to market the Jahresuhrenfabrik clocks. But in 1887, for some unknown reason, deGruyter allowed the patent to run out, and the idea was soon adopted by several other clock companies, and mass production of torsion suspension clocks began. To begin with, pendulums for the clocks consisted of a flat disc pendulum. Later on, several other designs of pendulums were developed in an attempt to make the clocks more reliable timekeepers, and eventually creation turned to the four ball pendulum we find on most of these clocks today.

In 1901, Bowler and Burdick, a jewelry store in Cleveland, OH took out a patent for the name Anniversary Clock as applied to the torsion suspension clock. This name soon caught on and it became common for people to choose an anniversary of some sort to wind the clock each year. This, along with 400 day Clocks, are commonly the names we give to these clocks today.

But the clocks, as nice as they looked in their glass domes with the pendulum swinging back and forth, were very poor timekeepers. Clockmakers spent many years in trying to develop a pendulum they thought would increased the accuracy of the clock. It was known that temperature change affected the accuracy, so experiments were carried out using various metals to counteract the expansion and contraction of the pendulum, but to no avail.

But it turned out they were attacking the wrong area. Where the problem lie was in the suspension spring itself. It was not until 1951 when Charles Terwillinger of Horolovar Company invented the Temperature Compensating Suspension Spring, that the clocks could be properly adjusted and become fairly accurate tellers of time.

400 Day Clocks became very popular gift items at the end of WWII when returning soldiers brought them back to North America by the thousands. Soon department and jewelry stores were importing them and they became very popular as wedding gifts. Around 1980, most torsion suspension clock manufacturers quit producing the key wind clocks, and turned their attention to those with quartz movements. Thus, these key wind clocks have now become sought after by collectors, and shall be the antiques of the near future.


Grandfather clock collection - Mauthe








I call this as a granpa clock. It is a gift from my late grandfather to me due to I'm his eldest grandson. So I plan to keep this as a gift to my first grandson as well. This clock is made in Germany. Brand Mauthe, the original one that keep from generation to generation not the clone one from Thailand. It will chime every quarters and very accurate keeping the time. The design is very rare since it has a design made from sea shells





A Brief History Of The Grandfather Clock

Wooden clocks add elegance and character to any home, and a clock you make yourself is certain to become a family heirloom that will last for generations. For over 30 years, Klockit has been dedicated to providing clock kits, plans and components to talented and creative individuals who handcraft these beautiful heirloom clocks to give as gifts, for resale and for their own use. We would like to share with you a bit of the history of the "Tall Case" or "Grandfather" clock so you also will appreciate why these beautiful clocks continue to be one of the most sought after and cherished home furnishings.


Cheyenne

Churchill Triple

Winthrop

Harland

Hemingway


Throughout the ages humankind has always searched for ways to keep track of time and has tried to improve on techniques for accurately marking its passing. Clock making has over 5000 years of history behind it and up until the advent of mechanical clocks in medieval Europe, the noteworthy links in the chain of timepieces were the shadow clocks, also called sundials, water powered devices named clepsydra, the hourglass and indexed candles. The very first mechanical clocks were developed during the second half of the 13th century, probably by central European monks. These early medieval clocks had no dials or arms and were massive devices made of heavy iron frames and gears. They were usually placed in the church tower and only struck bells on the hour by making use of the existing church bell. Eventually, an hour hand was added to the mechanical clocks and further enhancements enabled them to strike even the quarter-hour. By the first half of the 15th century, small domestic clocks started to appear and after the 1630s, a weight-driven timepiece, called the lantern clock, became popular in the homes of the upper classes.


The concept for the breakthrough in clock making is credited to Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), who discovered in 1582 that a pendulum could be used to keep time. Capitalizing on this discovery, in 1656 the Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens (1629-93) developed the first pendulum clock, which became the prototype for the grandfather clock. The first pendulum clocks, referred to as "wags-on-the-wall" at that time, had short pendulums and were hung on a wall with dangling cast-iron components that were encased in wood before long. Huygens‚ invention allowed clocks to run accurately to the point of three minutes loss or gain per day. Already by 1660, English clockmakers took over Huygens‚ design and introduced the approximately 6 feet long case with a 10-inch pendulum. In 1670, with the use of a longer pendulum of 39.1 inches, also called the Royal Pendulum and credited to Robert Hook, and the introduction of the anchor escapement by William Clement, the grandfather clock was born and mounted up to a height of just over 7 feet from the floor. As these improvements had increased precision up to only a few seconds per week variance, a minute handle was also added to the clocks for the first time. These clocks were later also encased with glass to display the pendulum and weights. However, the grandfather clocks as these pendulum clocks are known today, would be referred to as long case clocks or floor clocks until the 1880s.

In a manner of speaking, the period between 1630 and 1730 was the golden age of long case clocks. They were first made for royal families and nobles, but in time their production costs were cut down and the ownership of a long case clock became possible for some well-to-do households. Around 1685, long case clocks were imported into American colonies for the first time and roughly 10 years later their construction in the New World began. New York, New England, Pennsylvania and Virginia became long case clock making centers, however, until the 19th century American introduction of inexpensive brass movements, English clockmakers reigned supreme. Due to costs of craftsmanship and parts, in America too, they were only affordable for the well off families and became a symbol of socio-economic status and wealth.



Heritage

Legacy

Delaware

Amherst

Aristocrat


The term grandfather clock for long case or floor clocks became widespread in England and America by the 1880s thanks to a song composed by the American songwriter Henry Work in 1875, namely "the Grandfather's Clock". He was inspired by the story of an old floor clock that stood in the lobby of a country lodge named George Hotel in Piercebridge, North Yorkshire, England. While staying there, Henry Work was told that the clock had started losing time after the death of one of the two brothers Jenkins, who managed The George Hotel. No clocksmith had been able to fix the old timepiece and it had completely stopped when the surviving brother passed away at the age of ninety. The new hotel manager had never attempted to have it repaired and had left it standing in the lobby with the clock's arms in the position they had stopped. The song "Grandfather's Clock" shared this story and became very popular. Shortly after that, the long case or floor clocks, which were referred to by a variety of other names as well, came to be known as the grandfather clocks.

Since then, there have been innumerable improvements on time keeping devices. In the present day, pendulums have left their place to atomic vibrations for the purpose of accuracy. But, as an object of beauty and as an impressive symbol of the passage of time, nothing seems likely to replace the stately appearance of a grandfather‚s clock that stands about 6½ to 8 feet tall today. Smaller versions of the grandfather clock have assumed the name of grandmother clock (6 feet) and granddaughter clock (5 feet). Each of them is one of the best choices for starting a family heirloom, which will witness and share the good and bad times of many generations to come. Just listen to the lyrics of the "Grandfather Clock".

"In watching its pendulum swing to and fro
Many hours he spent when a boy
And through childhood and manhood, the clock seemed to know
And to share both his grief and his joy."


History of The Grandfather Clock

How The Grandfather Clock Got Its Name

Over 100 years ago in Piercebridge, North Yorkshire, England, there was a quaint country lodge known as the George Hotel.

The George hotel was managed by two bachelor brothers named Jenkins also from England.

In the lobby stood a floor clock, as they were called back in those days, that had been there for many years. One unusual characteristic on the old clock was that it kept very good time. This was uncommon, since in those days clocks were generally not noted for their accuracy.

One day, one of the brothers died and suddenly the old clock started losing time. At first it lost 15 minutes per day but when several clocksmiths gave up trying to repair the ailing timepiece, it was losing more than an hour each day.

The clocks incurable problem became as talked about as its precision had been. Some said it was no surprise that, though fully wound, the old clock stopped when the surviving brother died at the age of ninety.

The new manager of the hotel never attempted to have it repaired. He just left it standing in a sunlit corner of the lobby, its hands resting in the position they assumed the moment the last Jenkins brother died.

About 1875, an American songwriter named Henry Work happened to be staying at the George Hotel during a trip to England. He was told the story of the old clock and after seeing the clock for himself, decided to compose a song about the fascinating coincidence that the clock stopped forever the moment its elder owner passed away. Henry came back to America and published the lyrics that sold over a million copies of sheet music about the clock grandfather clock song. These are the opening words of the first stanza:

"Oh my grandfather's clock was too tall for the shelf so it stood ninety years on the floor. It was taller by half than the old man himself, though it weighed no a pennyweight more..."

Until that time, clocks such as the one in the old George Hotel were referred to by a variety of names, but not before Henry Work wrote his song, over a hundred years ago, were they referred to as grandfather clocks. The grandfather clock song is below.

Saturday, April 17, 2010

Malay Classic Weapon - Keris for sale 1





This is not a a warrior weapon and never involved in any war or fight. This is only old weapon that keep for collection(But I'm not sure how old is it).
This weapon made from brass material ang got some arabic letters on it.(I'm not sure what is it means)
I will let go this piece for RM380 plus shipping cost



Keris Brief info

The kris or keris, with its elaborately carved handle and wavy blade is a unique icon in Malay cultural history. In the last century, it evolved from a royal weapon of choice to a status symbol in Malay history. The degree of elaborate designs dictated the status in old Malay hierarchy.

Historically, there are several different styles of keris. The largest were used by the royal guards and warriors. Cradled in the left arm, they were more like swords, many with straight practical blades, light in both weight and design. The more common types back then were heavily ornamented with bulbous handles. Another type is the short ornamental keris designed for female royalty. This then has become the definition of the keris – from a practical weapon to a piece of ornamental jewelry.

The Keris is more than a weapon

Keris made in the Malay peninsula often carry a birdlike hilt called the java demam, while those from Java are smooth elongated affairs, with small carvings called patra. The warangan obtained through the complex process or damascene pattern, which looks like silvery whirls and spirals on the black surface of the keris. In pre-islamic days, keris hilts were carved in the humanlike form of Hindu deities.
With the advent of Islam and its ban on the portrayal of human forms, it encouraged hilt carvers to incorporate abstract forms and motifs such as the jawa-demam.

Even today, many Malay families pass down the odd keris or badik, a dagger originating from Makasar, as a family heirlooms, with bits of family lore attached to the weapon. A connoisseur can trace a family's origins by studying the weapons fittings and details, which differs in every region of the archipelago. In the past, people acquired a new keris every time an important event took place, such as puberty, marriage and the acquisition of property. When a person reaches puberty, the father would approach an empu (master smith) to commission the first keris, giving details of the child's age and characteristics. The gift of the keris is not to encourage him to fight but to instill a sense of responsibility.
Keris cleansing ritual - A kris blade is bathed in a small
wooden trough and dried over hot coals placed in a small incense burner.
Europeans had branded the keris as a cowardly weapon, as the blade was said to be laced with warangan or arsenic, a substance used in its cleaning ritual. Arsenic attacks the stomach and the intestines, so the victim dies a slow death as he practically explodes from within.

The gradual loss of knowledge about the keris was caused partly by the long period of colonisation in the region, and the belief that traditions connected to the weapon were somehow un-Islamic.

A dying breed of skilled keris craftsmen and blacksmiths undertakes the making of the keris. The skill being passed down from generation to generation is now in danger of being lost. The younger generation lacks the interest and prefers to migrate to the city in their search for other job opportunities and other things.

Levis buckle (Used) for sale



Buckle Levis (used) for sale. The leather belt already damaged. Price RM50 plus shipping cost


LEVI STRAUSS: A SHORT BIOGRAPHY
© Lynn Downey, Levi Strauss & Co. Historian 2008
Levi Strauss, the inventor of the quintessential American garment - the blue jean -was born in Buttenheim, Bavaria on February 26, 1829 to Hirsch Strauss and his second wife, Rebecca Haas Strauss. Levi - named "Loeb" at birth – had three older brothers and three older sisters, but his sister Fanny (born Vogele) was the only other child of his mother, Rebecca.
Hirsch succumbed to tuberculosis in 1845 and two years later Rebecca, Levi, Fanny, and the next oldest sister Maila emigrated to New York. There, they were met by Jonas and Louis, two of the older brothers, who had already made the journey and had started a wholesale dry goods business, called “J. Strauss Brother & Co.” Young Loeb soon began to learn the trade himself, and by 1850 he was known among his family and customers as “Levi” (in the census of that year, his name is spelled “Levy.”).
When news of the California Gold Rush made its way east, Levi emigrated to San Francisco to make his fortune, though he knew he wouldn’t make it panning gold. At the end of January 1853 he became an American citizen, and in February he headed for the West coast via the Isthmus of Panama. He arrived in bustling, noisy San Franciscoin early March, establishing a wholesale dry goods business under his own name and also serving as the West Coast representative of the family’s New York firm. His new company imported dry goods – clothing, underwear, umbrellas, handkerchiefs, bolts of fabric – and sold them to the small stores that were springing up all over California and the West. It was these stores that helped outfit the miners of the Gold Rush and, eventually, the new families that began to populate the western regions.
The first address where Levi conducted business (that we know of) was at 90 Sacramento Street, and the name of his firm was simply, “Levi Strauss.” In the 1850s this location was very close to the waterfront, handy for receiving and selling the goods that arrived by ship from his brother Jonas in New York. In 1856 Levi moved the business to 62 Sacramento Street and then to 63 & 65 Sacramento as its trade and reputation expanded. By this time David Stern - who was married to Levi’s sister Fanny - was associated with the firm. In 1861 the business relocated to 317 & 317 Sacramento Street, and in 1863 the company was renamed “Levi Strauss & Co.” Then in 1866 Levi moved the headquarters again, to larger quarters at 14-16 Battery Street, where it remained for the next forty years.
In his mid-thirties, Levi was already a well-known figure around the city. He was active in the business and cultural life of San Francisco, and actively supported the Jewish community, including Temple Emanu-El, the city's first synagogue. Despite his stature as an important business man, he insisted that his employees call him Levi, and not Mr. Strauss.
In 1872, Levi received a letter from Jacob Davis, a Reno, Nevada tailor. Davis was one of Levi Strauss’ regular customers; he purchased bolts of cloth from the company to use for his own business. In his letter, he told the prosperous merchant about the interesting way he made pants for his customers: he placed metal rivets at the points of strain - pocket corners, and at the base of the button fly. He did this in order to make the pants stronger for the laboring men who were his customers. He wanted to patent this new idea but needed a business partner to get the idea off the ground. So he suggested that the two men take out the patent together (sharing the costs, as well). Levi was enthusiastic about the idea and the patent was granted to both men on May 20, 1873. The blue jean was born.
He knew that demand would be great for these riveted "waist overalls" (the old name for jeans), so Levi brought Jacob Davis to San Francisco to oversee the first West Coast manufacturing facility. It’s possible that the first manufacture of the jeans was undertaken
b
space and then opened his own factory south of Market Street (though the dates and information are a bit vague here, thanks to the loss of the company’s historical records in the 1906 earthquake and fire). The famous 501® jean – known at the time simply as “XX” – was soon a best seller, as were the other riveted products Levi and Jacob added to their new manufacturedlines. Levi ca
and treasurer of the San Francisco Board of Trade in 1877. He was a director of the Nevada Bank, the Liverpool, London and Globe Insurance Company and the San Francisco Gas and Electric Company. In 1875 Levi and two associates purchased the Mission and Pacific WooleMills from the estate of former silver millionaire William Ralston, and the mill's fabric was used to make the Levi Strauss & Co. "blanket-lined" pants and coats. He was also one of the city’s greatest philanthropists. Levi was
Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home, the Eureka Benevolent Society and the Hebrew BoardRelief. In 1895 he and a number of other prominent San Franciscans provided funds to build anew railroad from San Francisco to the San Joaquin Valley (a project which unfortunately failed)And in 1897 Levi provided the funds for twenty-eight scholarships at the University of California, Berkeley. As the end o
the business, though he had brought his nephews into the firm by this time. David Stern had diedin 1874 and his four sons - Jacob, Sigmund, Louis and Abraham – were now working with their uncle Levi. In 1890 - the year that the XX waist overall was given the lot number "501®" - Levi and his nephews officially incorporated the company. During the week of September 22, 1902 Levi began to c
the 26th, he felt well enough to attend the family dinner at the home on Leavenworth Street which he shared with Jacob Stern’s family. He awakened briefly in the night, and told the nurse in attendance that he felt "as comfortable as I can under the circumstances.” Then, peacefully, he died. His dea
Monday, the day of his funeral, local businesses were temporarily closed so that their proprietors could attend the services. The eulogy was read at Levi’s home by Rabbi Jacob Voorsanger of Temple Emanu-El; afterward, company employees escorted the casket to the Southern Pacific railway station, where it was transported to the Hills of Eternity Cemetery in Colma (now Home oPeace), south of San Francisco. Levi's estate amounted to nearly $
other family members. Other bequests were made to the Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum, the Home for Aged Israelites, the Roman Catholic and Protestant Orphan Asylums, Eureka Benevolent Society and the Emanu-El Sisterhood. In summing up Levi's life and the establishment of hi
"Fairness and integrity in his dealings with his Eastern factors and his customers and liberality toward his employees soon gave the house a standing second to none on the coast." An even more fitting testimonial was pronounced by the San Francisco Board of Trade in a special resolution:
likewise suffered a signal loss in the death of he Un
Mr. Strauss, whose splendid endowments to t
versity of California will be an enduring ic-minded
testimonial of his worth as a liberal, publ
citizen and whose numberless unostentatious acts
charity in which neither race nor creed were recognized, exemplified his broad and generous love for and sympathy
with humanity."
On April 18, 1906 San Francisco was devastated by a massive earthquake and fire. Counted among the buildings which did not survive the catastrophe was the headquarters of Levi Strauss & Co. on Battery Street. The building survived the earthquake, but not the fire, which raged for three long days: all dry goods, furnishings and business records were destroyed. The factory suffered the same fate.
It was a great loss; but it did not signal the end to the company. As the ashes cooled, the Stern brothers made plans for a new facility and a new factory, as their uncle Levi would no doubt have done. They also continued to pay employee salaries and extended credit to other, less fortunate merchants until they could get back on their feet.
For although buildings and factories fell, the company built by Levi Strauss was bedrock solid, due to his foresight, his business sense and his unswerving devotion to quality.

Friday, April 16, 2010

1-0001-Item for sale-Banknote 9 (Australia banknote)


Aussie banknote-1 pounder Commonwealth of Australia..very nice collection

1-0001-Item for sale-Banknote 8 (New Zealand banknote)


New Zealand banknotes 1 dollar.Is it old notes? I'm not sure whether this note still legal tender or not. But of course it is collectible

Thursday, April 15, 2010

1-0001-Item for sale-Banknote 7 (Philippines banknote)


Maybe my Philippines buddy can help to explain the value of 2 piso. Can it buy a pack of cigarettes or a glass of coke? please help....

1-0001-Item for sale-Banknote 6 (Korea banknote)



Anybody knows the value of the above banknotes?

1-0001-Item for sale-Banknote 5 (Turkey banknote)







I got this notes as a souvenirs from Turkish friends when I visit Germany a few years back. But I do not know the value of this notes. Just keep it since it has a sentimental values.



Monday, April 12, 2010

Commemorative-Cruise Liner (92.5 fine silver)



Cruise Liner of the Millennium
Material:92.5 fine silver
Price:RM500(plus shipping)


Cruise brief info

A cruise ship or cruise liner is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the ship's amenities are part of the experience. Cruising has become a major part of the tourism industry, accounting for U.S.$27 billion with over 18 million passengers carried worldwide [1] in 2010. The world's largest cruise liner is Royal Carribean International's Oasis of the Seas. The industry's rapid growth has seen nine or more newly built ships catering to a North American clientele added every year since 2001, as well as others servicing European clientele. Smaller markets such as the Asia-Pacific region are generally serviced by older tonnage displaced by new ships introduced into the high growth areas. Cruise ships operate mostly on routes that return passengers to their originating port. In contrast, dedicated transport oriented ocean liners do "line voyages" and typically transport passengers from one point to another, rather than on round trips. Some cruise ships also engage in longer trips which may not lead back to the same port for many months (longer round trips).

Traditionally, an ocean liner for the transoceanic trade will be built to a higher standard than a typical cruise ship, including stronger plating to withstand ocean voyages, most commonly crossing the North Atlantic. The only dedicated transatlantic ocean liner in operation as a liner, as of February 2010, is the Queen Mary 2 of the Cunard fleet. The liner Queen Mary is in service as a hotel in Long Beach, USA, the Queen Elizabeth 2 is slated for similar duty in Cape Town, and the United States is currently stored in Philadelphia, USA, with long-standing plans to return it to service, although this appears increasingly unlikely given her age and condition.Some former ocean liners currently operate as cruise ships, however this number is ever decreasing. The MS Marco Polo and MS Mona Lisa are examples.