Sunday, June 6, 2010

Antique / Vintage Teak Wood Mirror

Mirror Mirror on the wall....

This is very antique / vintage teak wood mirror. I do not know the exact age of this mirror.This mirror is originate from Indonesia and all the design is carefully and beautifully handcarved.This is definitely collectors (one of a kind) item and suitable for office or home display / decorative items.

Approximate dimension: 1500mm * 900mm
I do not measure the actual weight.

Mirror info

A mirror is an object with at least one reflective surface. The most familiar type of mirror is the plane mirror, which has a flat surface. Curved mirrors are also used, to produce magnified or diminished images or focus light or simply distort the reflected image.

Mirrors are commonly used for personal grooming or admiring ones self (in which case the old-fashioned term "looking-glass" can be used), decoration, and architecture. Mirrors are also used in scientific apparatus such as telescopes and lasers, cameras, and industrial machinery. Most mirrors are designed for visible light; however, mirrors designed for other types of waves or other wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation are also used, especially in non-optical instruments.

History of mirror

Seated woman holding a mirror. Ancient Greek Attic red-figure lekythos, ca. 470-460 BC, National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
A sculpture of a lady looking into a mirror, IndiaThe first mirrors used by people were most likely pools of dark, still water, or water collected in a primitive vessel of some sort. The earliest manufactured mirrors were pieces of polished stone such as obsidian, a naturally occurring volcanic glass. Examples of obsidian mirrors found in Anatolia (modern-day Turkey) have been dated to around 6000 BC. Polished stone mirrors from central and south America date from around 2000 BC onwards.Mirrors of polished copper were crafted in Mesopotamia from 4000 BC,and in ancient Egypt from around 3000 BC.In China, bronze mirrors were manufactured from around 2000 BC,some of the earliest bronze and copper examples being produced by the Qijia culture. Mirrors made of other metal mixtures (alloys) such as copper and tin speculum metal may have also been produced in China and India.Mirrors of speculum metal or any precious metal were hard to produce and were only owned by the wealthy.

Metal-coated glass mirrors are said to have been invented in Sidon (modern-day Lebanon) in the first century AD,and glass mirrors backed with gold leaf are mentioned by the Roman author Pliny in his Natural History, written in about 77 AD.The Romans also developed a technique for creating crude mirrors by coating blown glass with molten lead.

Parabolic mirrors were described and studied in classical antiquity by the mathematician Diocles in his work On Burning Mirrors.Ptolemy conducted a number of experiments with curved polished iron mirrors,and discussed plane, convex spherical, and concave spherical mirrors in his Optics.Parabolic mirrors were also described by the physicist Ibn Sahl in the 10th century,and Ibn al-Haytham discussed concave and convex mirrors in both cylindrical and spherical geometries,carried out a number of experiments with mirrors, and solved the problem of finding the point on a convex mirror at which a ray coming from one point is reflected to another point. By the 11th century, clear glass mirrors were being produced in Moorish Spain.

Some time during the early Renaissance, European manufacturers perfected a superior method of coating glass with a tin-mercury amalgam. The exact date and location of the discovery is unknown, but in the 16th century, Venice, a city famed for its glass-making expertise, became a centre of mirror production using this new technique. Glass mirrors from this period were extremely expensive luxuries.The Saint-Gobain factory, founded by royal initiative in France, was an important manufacturer, and Bohemian and German glass, often rather cheaper, was also important.

The invention of the silvered-glass mirror is credited to German chemist Justus von Liebig in 1835.His process involved the deposition of a thin layer of metallic silver onto glass through the chemical reduction of silver nitrate. This silvering process was adapted for mass manufacturing and led to the greater availability of affordable mirrors. Nowadays, mirrors are often produced by the vacuum deposition of aluminium (or sometimes silver) directly onto the glass substrate.

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